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Unruly Daughters: A Romance of the House of Orléans (Classic Reprint)

Unruly Daughters: A Romance of the House of Orléans (Classic Reprint)

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Excerpt from Unruly Daughters: A Romance of the House of Orléans The Duchesse de Berry - Her portrait by Largilliére - Maa'ame's description of her - Her odious character - Her intimacy with the Duchesse de Bourgogne - Her jealousy of that prin cess - Her husband's infatuation for her - She gets disgrace fully intoxicated at saint-cloud - She joins the Cabal of Meudon - Rupture between her and the Duchesse de Bour gogne - She persuades the Due de Berry to break Off his friendly relations with his sister-in-law - She is severely reprimanded by the King - Illness and death of the Dauphin - Despair Of the Duchesse de Berry, who sees all her plans ruined by this event - Magnanimity of the Duchesse de Bour gogne, now Dauphine - Indignation of the Duchesse de Berry at being compelled to render ceremonial service to her sister-in law - Abominable rumours concerning her relations with her father-saint-simon informs the Due d'orléans of these, and the prince, to his astonishment and indignation, reports the conversation to his daughter - The Duchesse de Berry gives birth prematurely to a daughter - Insolence of the princess towards her mother - Madame is charged by the King to reprimand her granddaughter - Mlle. De Vienne - The affair of the diamond necklace. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.